Areas of Specialization

Family Medicine

Primary Care


Osteopathic Manipulation Treatment

Need Imaging Services?

We work closely with many stand alone diagnostic imaging centers. We will check with your insurance company to make sure you stay in-network with our imaging orders.

X-Ray

X-ray imaging is the oldest and most frequently used form of medical imaging for the entire body. It is a painless medical test that helps physicians diagnose and treat various conditions such as determining whether a bone has been fractured, locating foreign objects, and assisting in the detection and diagnosis of cancer.

X-rays are a form of electromagnetic radiation, just like visible light, and an X-ray machine is essentially a camera. Instead of visible light, however, it uses X-rays to expose the image.

To make an X-ray (radiograph), a part of the body is exposed to a small quantity of X-rays, and since bone, fat, muscle, tumors, and other masses all absorb X-rays at different levels; you see different shaded structures on the digital image that is produced.

When properly used by a radiologist and technologist specially trained to minimize exposure, X-rays are safe and no radiation remains afterward.

Magnetic Resonance (MRI)

Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is an imaging diagnostic system using radio waves, a magnetic field, and a computer to visualize internal organs of the human body and obtain diagnostic information. An MRI displays images of the body in “slices” similar to that of a CT scan, but it is also able to reflect greater contrast between different types of body tissues.

MRI images are produced without the use of radiation and there are no known side or after-effects. The procedure is painless, noninvasive, and you won’t see or feel anything during the exam. A faint knocking sound will be heard, which is the imaging process in operation. In some instances, contrast agents, such as gadolinium, are used to enhance certain anatomical structures and increase the diagnostic accuracy of the images.

Magnetic resonance imaging is used for virtually all parts of the body and is one of the advanced imaging techniques utilized at Akumin. In addition to its use to view precise details of the head, neck, spine, muscles, joints, and bones, it is also used to image the chest, abdomen and pelvis. Frequently, the differentiation of abnormal (diseased) tissue from normal tissues is better with MRI than with other imaging modalities such as X-ray, CT, and ultrasound.

Ultrasound

Diagnostic ultrasound is an established method of diagnostic medical imaging using a high-frequency sound wave and the principle of sonar to create an image. It is a reliable, cost-effective means of evaluating many internal organs, including the liver, pancreas, spleen, kidneys, aorta, gallbladder, ovaries, uterus, prostate, testicles, and thyroid. It is routinely used to evaluate fetal growth and complications of pregnancy.

Since ultrasound images are captured in real-time, they can show movement of internal tissues and organs, and enable physicians to see blood flow and heart valve functions. This can help to diagnose a variety of heart conditions and to assess damage after a heart attack or other illness.

Diagnostic ultrasound is very patient friendly — there are no injections, it does not use ionizing radiation (or x-rays), and the ultrasonic waves cause no damage to human tissues. This type of test is therefore considered a very safe imaging technique and is an important tool utilized for both diagnosis and treatment of disease.

Laboratory Services

Complete Blood Count (CBC)

A complete blood count (CBC) is a blood test used to evaluate your overall health and detect a wide range of disorders, including anemia, infection and leukemia.

A complete blood count test measures several components and features of your blood, including:

  • Red blood cells, which carry oxygen
  • White blood cells, which fight infection
  • Hemoglobin, the oxygen-carrying protein in red blood cells
  • Hematocrit, the proportion of red blood cells to the fluid component, or plasma, in your blood
  • Platelets, which help with blood clotting

Abnormal increases or decreases in cell counts as revealed in a complete blood count may indicate that you have an underlying medical condition that calls for further evaluation.

Complete Metabolic Panel (CMP)

A comprehensive metabolic panel (CMP) is a test that measures 14 different substances in your blood. It provides important information about your body's chemical balance and metabolism. Metabolism is the process of how the body uses food and energy. A CMP includes tests for the following:

  • Glucose, a type of sugar and your body's main source of energy.
  • Calcium, one of the body's most important minerals. Calcium is essential for proper functioning of your nerves, muscles, and heart.
  • Sodium, potassium, carbon dioxide, and chloride. These are electrolytes, electrically charged minerals that help control the amount of fluids and the balance of acids and bases in your body.
  • Albumin, a protein made in the liver.
  • Total protein, which measures the total amount of protein in the blood.
  • ALP (alkaline phosphatase), ALT (alanine transaminase), and AST (aspartate aminotransferase). These are different enzymes made by the liver.
  • Bilirubin, a waste product made by the liver.
  • BUN (blood urea nitrogen) and creatinine, waste products removed from your blood by your kidneys.

Abnormal levels of any of these substances or combination of them can be a sign of a serious health problem.

Lipid Panel

High cholesterol usually causes no signs or symptoms. A complete cholesterol test is done to determine whether your cholesterol is high and estimate your risk of developing heart attacks and other forms of heart disease and diseases of the blood vessels.

A complete cholesterol test includes the calculation of four types of fats (lipids) in your blood:

  • Total cholesterol. This is a sum of your blood's cholesterol content.
  • High-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol. This is called the "good" cholesterol because it helps carry away LDL cholesterol, thus keeping arteries open and your blood flowing more freely.
  • Low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol. This is called the "bad" cholesterol. Too much of it in your blood causes the buildup of fatty deposits (plaques) in your arteries (atherosclerosis), which reduces blood flow. These plaques sometimes rupture and can lead to a heart attack or stroke.
  • Triglycerides. Triglycerides are a type of fat in the blood. When you eat, your body converts calories it doesn't need into triglycerides, which are stored in fat cells. High triglyceride levels are associated with several factors, including being overweight, eating too many sweets or drinking too much alcohol, smoking, being sedentary, or having diabetes with elevated blood sugar levels.

Thyroid Stimulating Hormone (TSH)

A TSH test is done to find out if your thyroid gland is working the way it should. It can tell you if it’s overactive (hyperthyroidism) or underactive (hypothyroidism). The test can also detect a thyroid disorder before you have any symptoms. If untreated, a thyroid disorder can cause health problems.


TSH stands for “thyroid stimulating hormone” and the test measures how much of this hormone is in your blood. TSH is produced by the pituitary gland in your brain. This gland tells your thyroid to make and release the thyroid hormones into your blood.

Vitamin D

Vitamin D is a nutrient that is essential for healthy bones and teeth. There are two forms of vitamin D that are important for nutrition: vitamin D2 and vitamin D3. Vitamin D2 mainly comes from fortified foods like breakfast cereals, milk, and other dairy items. Vitamin D3 is made by your own body when you are exposed to sunlight. It is also found in some foods, including eggs and fatty fish, such as salmon, tuna, and mackerel.


In your bloodstream, vitamin D2 and vitamin D3 are changed into a form of vitamin D called 25 hydroxyvitamin D, also known as 25(OH)D. A vitamin D blood test measures the level of 25(OH)D in your blood. Abnormal levels of vitamin D can indicate bone disorders, nutrition problems, organ damage, or other medical conditions.

Vitamin B-12

Vitamin B-12 is an important vitamin for many bodily functions, such as brain health, blood cell production, and proper nerve functioning. There are several ways to test your B-12 levels. You can get your blood drawn or take a home urine test. These tests will look at the levels of your:

overall vitamin B-12

methylmalonic acid (MMA)

homocysteine

holotranscobalamin (holoTC)

Research suggests that MMA and holoTCTrusted Source may be more accurate at reading low B-12 levels because they represent active B-12. Low B-12 levels can lead to:

permanent nerve damage

deteriorating brain functions

memory loss

temporary infertility in women

People who are obese or eat a lot of meat also tend to have higher-than-normal levels. High levels of vitamin B-12 can be a sign of liver disease, certain types of leukemia, or diabetes.

Vitamin B-12 deficiency is a common condition. Between 1.5 and 15 percent of Americans have low levels of vitamin B-12, according to the National Institutes of Health. Many people, especially older adults and people with intestinal disorders, have trouble absorbing vitamin B-12 from food and oral supplements.

Urinalysis

A urinalysis is a test of your urine. A urinalysis is used to detect and manage a wide range of disorders, such as urinary tract infections, kidney disease and diabetes.


A urinalysis involves checking the appearance, concentration and content of urine. Abnormal urinalysis results may point to a disease or illness.


For example, a urinary tract infection can make urine look cloudy instead of clear. Increased levels of protein in urine can be a sign of kidney disease. Unusual urinalysis results often require more testing to uncover the source of the problem.

Sexually Transmitted Diseases (STD's) Panel


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